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By its 50th anniversary in 2028, the University of Passau intends to become one of the leading centres in Europe for basic interdisciplinary research on the effects of digitalisation on society. The University focuses its research on the guiding themes of ‘Digitalisation, Networked Society and (Internet) Cultures’, ‘Europe and Global Transformation’ and ‘Migration, Sustainable Development and Just Order’.

Digital Research Magazine

The Digital Research Magazine presents selected projects on the University's research themes in a high-quality online format. The profiles of the researchers behind major projects are also showcased in the magazine.

Screenshots of the University's Digital Research Magazine

The overarching research themes are a logical extension of the founding principles of the University of Passau, which was established in 1978 as a so-called ‘borderland’ university. At the time, due to its proximity to both Austria and the Iron Curtain, the issues facing Europe were quite literally ‘close to home’. This history is taken up by the research theme ‘Europe and Global Transformation’.

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Current projects related to the theme ‘Europe and Global Transformation’

EU-project SUNI-SEA: Fight against 'silent killers' in Southeast Asia

High blood pressure and diabetes have also developed into widespread diseases in Southeast Asia. A team from the University of Passau is participating in the EU project SUNI-SEA, which aims to massively increase effective prevention.

Chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases have long been considered a problem in Western countries. Now, these non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are also on the rise in low- and middle-income countries. In South-East Asian countries, up to 75 per cent of deaths are caused by NCDs.

The diseases, dubbed 'silent killers', are so insidious because they damage the body in a creeping process: patients do not feel pain until severe damage has occurred. Nevertheless, they can be well influenced by early diagnosis and lifestyle changes.

This is what the project 'SUNI-SEA - Scaling Up NCD Interventions', led by HelpAge International UK and funded under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme, aims to achieve: It examines existing prevention programmes in Indonesia, Myanmar and Vietnam and looks at how to strengthen and expand particularly effective measures.

‘We want to considerably reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases in these countries’, sayd Michael Grimm, Professor of Development Economics at the University of Passau. Together with his team, he contributes expertise in the field of data analysis: The researchers from Passau provide tools to measure the impact of existing measures. On this basis, they design proposals to significantly increase their effects.

90-90-90 target in prevention

‘The target of the project is that 90 per cent of the population should be aware of the risk factors, and 90 per cent of those need to get a proper diagnosis, and 90 per cent of those a proper treatment’, sayd Professor Grimm. Currently, the results of existing prevention programmes in the countries to be studied fall far short of these numbers as they reach only one-third of those at risk for hypertension and diabetes.

There are significant gender differences when it comes to diabetes and hypertension: obesity and nutrition have a higher impact on women’s health, whereas smoking and alcohol use are more important in men’s health. In addition, health-seeking behaviours differ, with men ignoring health complaints for a long time before seeking advice, and women receiving an inadequate care for their complaints.

Partners in Europe and South-East Asia

The project is coordinated by HelpAge International UK, a non-governmental organisation. Its European partners in the project are the University of Passau, the University of Groeningen (Netherlands) and the University of Travna (Slovakia) participate in the project. In South-East-Asia, the Universitas Sebelas Maret (Indonesia), the University of Public Health (Myanmar), the Thai Nguyen University for Medicine & Pharmacy and the Health Strategy and Policy Institute (both Vietnam) are partners.

In Indonesia, the National Social Health Insurance and the Ministry of Health are assoicated partners.

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 825026.


Principal Investigator(s) at the University Prof. Dr. Michael Grimm (Lehrstuhl für Development Economics)
Project period 01.01.19 - 31.12.22
Website https://www.suni-sea.org
Source of funding
Europäische Union (EU) > EU - 8. Forschungsrahmenprogramm (Horizon 2020)
Project number 825026
Areas Economics


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In recent years, Europe's responsibility to respond to global challenges with appropriate strategies has increasingly prompted researchers at the University of Passau to make development questions a matter of academic enquiry. The interdisciplinary path taken has brought about not only the interfaculty master's programme in Development Studies but also the research theme ‘Migration, Sustainable Development and Just Order’.

Research theme ‘Migration, Sustainable Development and Just Order’

Current projects related to ‘Migration, Sustainable Development and Just Order’

EU-project SUNI-SEA: Fight against 'silent killers' in Southeast Asia

High blood pressure and diabetes have also developed into widespread diseases in Southeast Asia. A team from the University of Passau is participating in the EU project SUNI-SEA, which aims to massively increase effective prevention.

Chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases have long been considered a problem in Western countries. Now, these non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are also on the rise in low- and middle-income countries. In South-East Asian countries, up to 75 per cent of deaths are caused by NCDs.

The diseases, dubbed 'silent killers', are so insidious because they damage the body in a creeping process: patients do not feel pain until severe damage has occurred. Nevertheless, they can be well influenced by early diagnosis and lifestyle changes.

This is what the project 'SUNI-SEA - Scaling Up NCD Interventions', led by HelpAge International UK and funded under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme, aims to achieve: It examines existing prevention programmes in Indonesia, Myanmar and Vietnam and looks at how to strengthen and expand particularly effective measures.

‘We want to considerably reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases in these countries’, sayd Michael Grimm, Professor of Development Economics at the University of Passau. Together with his team, he contributes expertise in the field of data analysis: The researchers from Passau provide tools to measure the impact of existing measures. On this basis, they design proposals to significantly increase their effects.

90-90-90 target in prevention

‘The target of the project is that 90 per cent of the population should be aware of the risk factors, and 90 per cent of those need to get a proper diagnosis, and 90 per cent of those a proper treatment’, sayd Professor Grimm. Currently, the results of existing prevention programmes in the countries to be studied fall far short of these numbers as they reach only one-third of those at risk for hypertension and diabetes.

There are significant gender differences when it comes to diabetes and hypertension: obesity and nutrition have a higher impact on women’s health, whereas smoking and alcohol use are more important in men’s health. In addition, health-seeking behaviours differ, with men ignoring health complaints for a long time before seeking advice, and women receiving an inadequate care for their complaints.

Partners in Europe and South-East Asia

The project is coordinated by HelpAge International UK, a non-governmental organisation. Its European partners in the project are the University of Passau, the University of Groeningen (Netherlands) and the University of Travna (Slovakia) participate in the project. In South-East-Asia, the Universitas Sebelas Maret (Indonesia), the University of Public Health (Myanmar), the Thai Nguyen University for Medicine & Pharmacy and the Health Strategy and Policy Institute (both Vietnam) are partners.

In Indonesia, the National Social Health Insurance and the Ministry of Health are assoicated partners.

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 825026.


Principal Investigator(s) at the University Prof. Dr. Michael Grimm (Lehrstuhl für Development Economics)
Project period 01.01.19 - 31.12.22
Website https://www.suni-sea.org
Source of funding
Europäische Union (EU) > EU - 8. Forschungsrahmenprogramm (Horizon 2020)
Project number 825026
Areas Economics


return to previous page

Since 2011, the University of Passau has consistently dealt with another global development across academic disciplines and faculty borders: the societal effects of digitalisation. The Technik Plus development programme and the second phase of the successful DFG Research Training Group ‘Privacy’ have provided a sustained impetus for interdisciplinary co-operation between the faculties. One example of this co-operation is the BMBF-funded SKILL project (website in German), which analyses the societal effects of digitalisation on teaching and learning environments and places a strong focus on information and media literacy. Another example is the Passau Centre for e-Humanities (website in German), which is also funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Due to the successful co-operation in these and many other projects, the academics at the University of Passau developed the focus ‘Digitalisation, Networked Society and (Internet) Cultures’.

Current projects related to ‘Digitalisation, Networked Society and (Internet) Cultures’

EU-project SUNI-SEA: Fight against 'silent killers' in Southeast Asia

High blood pressure and diabetes have also developed into widespread diseases in Southeast Asia. A team from the University of Passau is participating in the EU project SUNI-SEA, which aims to massively increase effective prevention.

Chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases have long been considered a problem in Western countries. Now, these non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are also on the rise in low- and middle-income countries. In South-East Asian countries, up to 75 per cent of deaths are caused by NCDs.

The diseases, dubbed 'silent killers', are so insidious because they damage the body in a creeping process: patients do not feel pain until severe damage has occurred. Nevertheless, they can be well influenced by early diagnosis and lifestyle changes.

This is what the project 'SUNI-SEA - Scaling Up NCD Interventions', led by HelpAge International UK and funded under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme, aims to achieve: It examines existing prevention programmes in Indonesia, Myanmar and Vietnam and looks at how to strengthen and expand particularly effective measures.

‘We want to considerably reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases in these countries’, sayd Michael Grimm, Professor of Development Economics at the University of Passau. Together with his team, he contributes expertise in the field of data analysis: The researchers from Passau provide tools to measure the impact of existing measures. On this basis, they design proposals to significantly increase their effects.

90-90-90 target in prevention

‘The target of the project is that 90 per cent of the population should be aware of the risk factors, and 90 per cent of those need to get a proper diagnosis, and 90 per cent of those a proper treatment’, sayd Professor Grimm. Currently, the results of existing prevention programmes in the countries to be studied fall far short of these numbers as they reach only one-third of those at risk for hypertension and diabetes.

There are significant gender differences when it comes to diabetes and hypertension: obesity and nutrition have a higher impact on women’s health, whereas smoking and alcohol use are more important in men’s health. In addition, health-seeking behaviours differ, with men ignoring health complaints for a long time before seeking advice, and women receiving an inadequate care for their complaints.

Partners in Europe and South-East Asia

The project is coordinated by HelpAge International UK, a non-governmental organisation. Its European partners in the project are the University of Passau, the University of Groeningen (Netherlands) and the University of Travna (Slovakia) participate in the project. In South-East-Asia, the Universitas Sebelas Maret (Indonesia), the University of Public Health (Myanmar), the Thai Nguyen University for Medicine & Pharmacy and the Health Strategy and Policy Institute (both Vietnam) are partners.

In Indonesia, the National Social Health Insurance and the Ministry of Health are assoicated partners.

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 825026.


Principal Investigator(s) at the University Prof. Dr. Michael Grimm (Lehrstuhl für Development Economics)
Project period 01.01.19 - 31.12.22
Website https://www.suni-sea.org
Source of funding
Europäische Union (EU) > EU - 8. Forschungsrahmenprogramm (Horizon 2020)
Project number 825026
Areas Economics


return to previous page
Research theme 'Digitalisation, Networked Society and (Internet) Cultures'

Passau International Centre for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies (PICAIS)

The University is currently in the process of establishing the Passau International Centre for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies (PICAIS) as a visible place on campus for the advancement of exemplary research, international network-building and for the support of early career researchers. It will be designed as a permanent, autonomous University institution that is particularly suited to furthering the visibility of our research output, as another cornerstone of the internationalisation of our research.

Any university that strives to maintain sustained excellence in research and teaching must provide a first-rate support base for those setting out on their research careers. To this end, the University has made it a core objective to give its early career researchers the best possible support when it comes to gaining qualifications and participating in (international) networks. We place particular emphasis on promoting female early career researchers and increasing the number of women professorial positions.

Promoting young talent (stock image)

When conducting world-class research, academics must rely on their creativity; but they also require administrative structures that reliably and comprehensively support them in their work. The Research Services Division provides professional advice and support on gaining funding from German and international donor organisations.